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MAILERDAEMON
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2005-01-19
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Female body proportions (special service for #plus613 users)

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Female body proportions (special service for #plus613 users)

Comments for: Female body proportions (special service for #plus613 users)
keeeel Report This Comment
Date: January 19, 2005 11:27PM

this applies great to caucasians but i believe spanish, asian, and africans should have a different model
BenRock Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 01:34AM

look at her ass.. its not even round
i love little round ass you can grab with ONE hand
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 01:44AM

Doctor May Have Beauty's Number
By Rafe Jones

Ever think a number could be beautiful? From the bad luck of 13 to the holiness of 3, people have long ascribed mystical and abstract properties to numbers. One number in particular has been associated with beauty for nearly 2,000 years, and it's not a number you can count to: the so-called "golden section" is an irrational number approximately equal to 0.618. Dr. Stephen Marquardt, a former plastic surgeon, has used the golden section and some of its relatives to make a mask that he claims is the most beautiful shape a human face can have.

This mysterious number has a horde of related quantities and shapes, many of which have long-standing associations with beauty. Among them is the "golden ratio," which is the ratio of 1.618-to-1. This ratio can be used to build so-called golden shapes; for instance, a golden rectangle is one whose ratio of width to height is the golden ratio. These rectangles have been considered beautiful by many artists, and they have made appearances in some of history's most renowned works of art. Using the golden ratio one can also make golden triangles, pentagons and decagons. Dr. Marquardt has tapped this golden tradition in making his mask — he's used a golden ratio-based arrangement of 40 golden decagons of six different sizes, carefully aligned with the face's various features.

Beauty Theory

According to Dr. Marquardt, beauty is a mechanism to ensure humans recognize and are attracted to other humans. "Other animals recognize members of their own species and have a tremendous reaction when they do," he says, noting dogs' common reaction to other dogs. He adds that humans are highly visual creatures, so we use sight as our primary means of recognition. The most beautiful faces, he claims, are the ones that are the most easily recognizable as human. "Beauty is really just humanness," he says.

Dr. Marquardt theorizes that we discern whether a face is obviously human by unconsciously comparing it to an ideal face that lurks in the unreachable recesses of the psyche. Since we have no direct access to this ideal "most human" face, we can't say precisely what it is; however, Dr. Marquardt claims he has captured the ideal face in his beauty mask. He says, "The mask radiates, it advertises and screams: 'human, human, human.' "

Whatever the reasons, the mask fits the faces of several famous beauties fairly well (see Timeless Beauty), and Dr. Marquardt has conducted a study that indicates a broad preference among many cultural groups for faces that closely correspond to his mask (see Cross-Cultural Beauty).

The key to the design of the mask, he says, is the golden section, that enigmatic number that has long stood for beauty. Knowledge of the golden section, ratio and rectangle goes back to the Greeks, who based their most famous work of art on them: the Parthenon is full of golden rectangles. The Greek followers of the mathematician and mystic Pythagoras even thought of the golden ratio as divine.

Later, Leonardo da Vinci painted Mona Lisa's face to fit perfectly into a golden rectangle, and structured the rest of the painting around similar rectangles. Mozart divided a striking number of his sonatas into two parts whose lengths reflect the golden ratio, though there is much debate about whether he was conscious of this. In more modern times, Hungarian composer Bela Bartok and French architect Le Corbusier purposefully incorporated the golden ratio into their work.

Even today, the golden ratio is in human-made objects all around us. Look at almost any Christian cross; the ratio of the vertical part to the horizontal is the golden ratio. To find a golden rectangle, you need to look no further than the credit cards in your wallet.

Perception and Mystique

Despite these numerous appearances in works of art throughout the ages, there is an ongoing debate among psychologists about whether people really do perceive the golden shapes, particularly the golden rectangle, as more beautiful than other shapes. In a 1995 article in the journal Perception, professor Christopher Green, of York University in Toronto, discusses several experiments over the years that have shown no measurable preference for the golden rectangle, but notes that several others have provided evidence suggesting such a preference exists.

Regardless of the science, the golden ratio retains a mystique, partly because excellent approximations of it turn up in many unexpected places in nature. The spiral inside a nautilus shell is remarkably close to the golden section, and the ratio of the lengths of the thorax and abdomen in most bees is nearly the golden ratio. Even a cross section of the most common form of human DNA fits nicely into a golden decagon. The golden ratio and its relatives also appear in many unexpected contexts in mathematics, and they continue to spark interest in the mathematical community.
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 01:44AM

Doctor May Have Beauty's Number
By Rafe Jones

Ever think a number could be beautiful? From the bad luck of 13 to the holiness of 3, people have long ascribed mystical and abstract properties to numbers. One number in particular has been associated with beauty for nearly 2,000 years, and it's not a number you can count to: the so-called "golden section" is an irrational number approximately equal to 0.618. Dr. Stephen Marquardt, a former plastic surgeon, has used the golden section and some of its relatives to make a mask that he claims is the most beautiful shape a human face can have.

This mysterious number has a horde of related quantities and shapes, many of which have long-standing associations with beauty. Among them is the "golden ratio," which is the ratio of 1.618-to-1. This ratio can be used to build so-called golden shapes; for instance, a golden rectangle is one whose ratio of width to height is the golden ratio. These rectangles have been considered beautiful by many artists, and they have made appearances in some of history's most renowned works of art. Using the golden ratio one can also make golden triangles, pentagons and decagons. Dr. Marquardt has tapped this golden tradition in making his mask — he's used a golden ratio-based arrangement of 40 golden decagons of six different sizes, carefully aligned with the face's various features.

Beauty Theory

According to Dr. Marquardt, beauty is a mechanism to ensure humans recognize and are attracted to other humans. "Other animals recognize members of their own species and have a tremendous reaction when they do," he says, noting dogs' common reaction to other dogs. He adds that humans are highly visual creatures, so we use sight as our primary means of recognition. The most beautiful faces, he claims, are the ones that are the most easily recognizable as human. "Beauty is really just humanness," he says.

Dr. Marquardt theorizes that we discern whether a face is obviously human by unconsciously comparing it to an ideal face that lurks in the unreachable recesses of the psyche. Since we have no direct access to this ideal "most human" face, we can't say precisely what it is; however, Dr. Marquardt claims he has captured the ideal face in his beauty mask. He says, "The mask radiates, it advertises and screams: 'human, human, human.' "

Whatever the reasons, the mask fits the faces of several famous beauties fairly well (see Timeless Beauty), and Dr. Marquardt has conducted a study that indicates a broad preference among many cultural groups for faces that closely correspond to his mask (see Cross-Cultural Beauty).

The key to the design of the mask, he says, is the golden section, that enigmatic number that has long stood for beauty. Knowledge of the golden section, ratio and rectangle goes back to the Greeks, who based their most famous work of art on them: the Parthenon is full of golden rectangles. The Greek followers of the mathematician and mystic Pythagoras even thought of the golden ratio as divine.

Later, Leonardo da Vinci painted Mona Lisa's face to fit perfectly into a golden rectangle, and structured the rest of the painting around similar rectangles. Mozart divided a striking number of his sonatas into two parts whose lengths reflect the golden ratio, though there is much debate about whether he was conscious of this. In more modern times, Hungarian composer Bela Bartok and French architect Le Corbusier purposefully incorporated the golden ratio into their work.

Even today, the golden ratio is in human-made objects all around us. Look at almost any Christian cross; the ratio of the vertical part to the horizontal is the golden ratio. To find a golden rectangle, you need to look no further than the credit cards in your wallet.

Perception and Mystique

Despite these numerous appearances in works of art throughout the ages, there is an ongoing debate among psychologists about whether people really do perceive the golden shapes, particularly the golden rectangle, as more beautiful than other shapes. In a 1995 article in the journal Perception, professor Christopher Green, of York University in Toronto, discusses several experiments over the years that have shown no measurable preference for the golden rectangle, but notes that several others have provided evidence suggesting such a preference exists.

Regardless of the science, the golden ratio retains a mystique, partly because excellent approximations of it turn up in many unexpected places in nature. The spiral inside a nautilus shell is remarkably close to the golden section, and the ratio of the lengths of the thorax and abdomen in most bees is nearly the golden ratio. Even a cross section of the most common form of human DNA fits nicely into a golden decagon. The golden ratio and its relatives also appear in many unexpected contexts in mathematics, and they continue to spark interest in the mathematical community.
Mexican_Guy Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 12:21PM

I...don't think I will be reading all that thank you
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 12:41PM

How about the abbreviated version, or just get to the fucking point.
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 01:48PM

the abbreviated point is that phi is considered the ratio that we as humans find attractive. if a woman was proportioned perfectly using phi, she would be aphrodite
anonymous Report This Comment
Date: January 20, 2005 10:17PM

The diagram looks like a man w/ breasts and no cock. Anyway, the whole idea that there could possibly be "one" physical ideal is so, so twisted. I myself am in total lust with any number of different women.
duuuuuuuuuuuuude Report This Comment
Date: January 22, 2005 08:54PM

chest and ass way to small, hips too skinny (which would then affect the thighs) and i like much shorter s (5'0 - 5'3 approximately)
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: February 17, 2005 01:15PM

sooo..that's where it all began!
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: April 08, 2005 03:56PM

its gay this is not porn!!!
netstalker Report This Comment
Date: May 06, 2005 11:21AM

There are many different ways to draw a rectangle. As soon as that happens it's seducing to seek the most perfect way. But any rectangle can be described as perfect for it's own intrinsic reasons. E.g., the rectangle based on the 3-4-5 triangle could be considered perfect. Or the rectangle with one length one and the other length the square root of two could be considered, or the 6x4 rectangle (of photographs) could be considered perfect given one side is 2/3 the length of the other. Or you could have the projection of a cylinder with the length pie times the width. There are all sorts of rectangles which give a perfect fit. Those who thing the golden rectangle is "perfect" would be hard pressed to tell the difference between it and between with ratio 1.5, purely by looking at it. Even if you could measure it. You can never perfectly draw the golden rectangle. I think it was deciden on as being perfect because of it's fractal self generating quality. This seems an attraction based on the complexity of how it is generated. But is it it any more perfect than any other rectangle? How can it be? It will never be drawn perfectly. To say the golden rectangle is more beautiful than other rectangles, is like to say a circle is more beautiful than an ellipse, perhaps. I think all "perfection" suggests is that the dimensions seem to be well understood; the better the understood they are tht more perfect they become. And because the golden section is observed to appear often it seems to add to it's aesthetics somehow. Like, see, it's such a good thing everybody's using it. You could argue the pentagon is the most perfect shape because it has so many golden ratios inside it. But others find octagons more pleasing. Still again, the hexagon could be considered more perfect because because it's based on the circle and perfectly fits 6 circles of an equal diameter around it. If you're looking fot the perfect answer and know what it is before you start looking, you're sure to be convinced, perhaps. Or unless you don't understand enough about it. You could have a golden scribble if you wanted to. Who knows what mysteries of the universe lay inside it.